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Building a Green Roof
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Trinity Church in Swarthmore, PA is interested in a 4200sq/ft "Green Roof". The waterproof membrane is in place and it's on to the next phase.

Please contribute your ideas, experience and expertise to help Trinity and others with this most solar of projects.






Trinity Update #8

Here are some pictures of the installation:


















Trinity Update #7


From: Megan Slootmaker
Date: Mon, May 18, 2009 at 1:30 PM
Subject: Green Roof Schedule

Pam/Paula

FYI... please see below (in red) for a rough schedule of the green roof installation next week. Maria Erades' (Emilio's mother) company may film some of it for a case study. Looks like the 28th may be the most interesting for the kids as the crane will be in operation.

Megan

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Howard Steinberg"
Date: May 18, 2009 12:04:17 PM EDT
Subject: RE: Case Study of Trinity's Green Roof
Hi Peter and Megan,
For clarity, JIG is the green roof installer. We are not sub-contracted under Roofscapes. Roofscapes provides the system warranty as it is their “specification” that we install. As such, it would seem appropriate for JIG to also be highlighted as the installer. The synergy between green roofs and the larger story about environmentally sustainable development exists inside of what JIG, Inc produces. Our green roof/construction company is one piece of a design-build development company called Onion Flats. We have created some of the first LEED certified Gold and Platinum projects in the country. If a press package would be helpful, I’d be happy to have my assistant forward this to you. Our website is www.onionflats.com as another resource.

Our current schedule is to be loading the drainage mats to the roof on the 26th and beginning the installation of them; completing on the 27th. The soil will be delivered on the 27th. The crane will hoist the soil to the roof on the 28th, the plants will be placed on the 29th along with the protection blankets. I would suggest that Thursday, May 28th would be the most dynamic day to film as the crane will be on site hoisting 2 ton bags of growing media to the roof.

Please call me if you need any additional information.

Howard B. Steinberg, AIA, Principal
Onion Flats, llc / Plumbob, llc / JIG Inc.
architecture design-build
111 w. norris street
philadelphia, pa 19122
p: 215.426.6466
f: 815.301.3431
c:215.901.1852
www.onionflats.com

P Please consider the environment
before printing this email


From: attines08@verizon.net [mailto:attines08@verizon.net]
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 7:56 PM
Subject: Re: Case Study of Trinity's Green Roof

All, this sounds great to have more of a spotlight on this greening. I want to make sure JIG, our installer, and Roofscapes, our designer, can be at hand on-site. Tentatively this might be early on Tues May 26 or Wed May 27, when there would be the upload of the roof assembly. I will be on travel, and away from email, starting Tues, back on email first thing Friday morning. I will be taking time from work on Tues May 26, and if the Greentreks crew could come out after 8 a.m., that would be good. I would be going back into the office later that morning, so the sooner in the morning, the better. Regards, Peter Weber


May 16, 2009 03:17:04 AM, megan wrote:
Hi Maria

It was nice to speak with you today and learn about your company and other endeavors! I'm excited about the opportunity to get our Green Roof project filmed and potentially used as a case study for your StormwaterPA venture. Additionally, Trinity would be interested in any resources you can highlight that would help us with our fundraising efforts.

As promised, here are a few resources for you:

Trinity's Green Roof webpage...

http://www.trinityswarthmore.org/green.html

National Geographic Article on Green Roofs...


http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/05/green-roofs/klinkenborg-text

Roofscapes (the installer) website (JIG is actually subcontracting under Roofscapes)...*Clarification of status by JIG*

http://www.roofscapes.com/

Also, as requested, I am copying Peter on this note to answer the following questions:
Peter, would you be willing to be interviewed on camera by Maria/GreenTreks for this case study to answer questions about the project/ finances/ technical aspects of our green roof installation? (Maria - perhaps you can provide a loose structure of questions ahead of time so he is prepared with facts as necessary)
Peter - Can you provide an installation schedule (identifying any good or bad filming/interviewing times and when you plan to be there) to Maria so she can plan when to come during the week of May 26-29?

Maria - please send Peter and I any general questions you have about the church as well (e.g., re: membership) and we can collect that information for you as well.

Thanks for your interest in our project and we look forward to working with you!

Best Regards
Megan Slootmaker





Trinity Update #6

Hi Grant,

Installation starts Tues May 26, and should be completed by Fri.
Actual hoisting of materials should be on Wed.
My first green roof.  Hope you can make it. 

Regards,

Peter




Trinity Update #5

Greetings Friends,

Trinity Church, Swarthmore, has committed to completing the Green Roof installation on the flat Education Wing. The community is invited to help celebrate this sustainable technology.

This Green Roof is scheduled to be installed in Swarthmore, PA during Earth Week 2009, starting on Monday April 20. A 4,200 square foot green roof will be installed by a premier and pioneer contractor (the contractor, JIG, is one of the installers working for Roofscapes, a pioneer Philadelphia (and US) green roof company). The public is invited to learn about green roofs on Earth Day, April 22, when we will offer a workshop on this sustainable technology.

Vegetated GREEN ROOFS are low-maintenance, energy-saving roofs, planted with hardy succulent ground cover, using plants called stonecrop or sedums. It exhibits advanced environmental and energy benefits. Because of its insulation value, the Green Roof reduces seasonal heating and cooling costs, to the extent of paying for itself in reduced utility costs. By using less energy, Trinity would also reduce air pollution caused by electric power generation. The Green Roof is designed to reduce wet weather discharges to storm sewers, by infiltrating precipitation in the living roof and slowing down any overflow. Currently when it rains, the stormwater goes directly to Little Crum Creek. The creek suffers from impaired water quality and severe flash flooding. Finally, this type of roof would be extremely durable, lasting as many as three times the life of a conventional roof. For these reasons, the Green Roof would be eminently sustainable.

The community is invited to help celebrate.

Please let me know if you would like to contribute to the celebration, by offering your expertise as you see fit. We are now planning the festivities, and you may become a part of them.

Happy Earth Day!

Peter Weber
Parish Buildings and Facilities
Trinity Swarthmore



Trinity Update #4

Hello all,

Please see this internet site for practical green roofing at the Scott
Arboretum of Swarthmore College.

1) http://blogs.scottarboretum.org/gardenseeds/

Remember that Trinity green roofing decision is scheduled for Jan. 19.

Peter

Peter A. Weber



Trinity Update #3

Greetings,

Here is the photo of the ponded water of the roof, about a day after the
rains stopped. The roof doesn't fully drain through the five scuppers.

Peter




Trinity Update #2

Hello Green Enthusiasts!

Please see the following on-line resource as part of our common interest
in ecological and economical greening.

I will be updating you soon regarding the green roof retrofit activities
at Trinity, by the verizon email account.

Regards!

Peter

Peter A. Weber
NPDES Permits Program (3WP41)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
1650 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
phone 215.814.5749
fax 215.814.2302
http://www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/npdes/index.htm

----- Forwarded by Peter Weber/R3/USEPA/US on 12/08/2008 08:09 AM -----

"Green Roofs for
Healthy Cities"
<jrichie@greenro To
ofs.org> Peter Weber/R3/USEPA/US
cc
12/02/2008 05:59
PM Subject
Living Architecture Monitor now
available online
Please respond
to
jrichie@greenroo
fs.org




Green Roofs for Healthy Cities’ mission is to develop the green roof and
wall industry across North America. We believe that it is not only
possible, but essential, to evolve the building industry into a powerful
force for restorative, high-performance buildings and know that green
roofs and walls will play a leading role in this transformation.


We invite you to read the Living Architecture Monitor, our new quarterly
magazine that is focused on educating, inspiring and celebrating the
emerging restorative, sustainable vision of architecture and landscape
design that extends beyond green roofs.







Trinity Update #1

All, here is what one of the three interested green roofing leads is suggesting. It seems to me that we may very well be looking at early Spring, but let us discuss. I will see some of you Sun 26th at Trinity's Adult Forum.


Let me know your thoughts in the meantime.


I will also be working up what the other two green leads are saying about completing the green roof.


Peter



-------- Begin forwarded message --------
Subject: RE: Shalom and greening Trinity Swarthmore roof
Date: 10/19/2008 11:28:54 AM
From: Charles Miller
To: attines08@verizon.net


Dear Peter,

I am glad that you now able to move forward with the green roof build out. The most economical way for you to build this green roof would be to employ one of our local green roof installation companies directly. My recollection is that this will be a simple Sedum cover.
Roofscapes, Inc. will provide design advice to our contractors. We will specify the materials and methods. We will also coordinate with Sarnafil, to insure that all warranty conditions are met. Our local certified companies are David Bros. Landscape, Jig, and Mayfield Gardens. You can find their contact information on our website. I will also pass your email on to these companies.

If your intent is to build the green roof this fall, it is now too late to install the green roof using cuttings (the least expensive method). You could install plugs or pre-grown mats until the end of November. Depending on your schedule requirements, the work could be delayed until early spring.

Sincerely,

Charlie Miller , PE, Principal
Roofscapes, Inc.
7135 Germantown Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19119
cmiller@roofmeadow.com
215-247-8784
215-247-4659 FAX

From: attines08@verizon.net [mailto:attines08@verizon.net]
Sent: Monday, October 06, 2008 7:31 AM
To: cmiller@roofmeadow.com; info@roofmeadow.com
Cc: The attines; Father Tom
Subject: Shalom and greening Trinity Swarthmore roof

Hi again Charlie,
We are contacting you again about the roof of the education wing of Trinity Swarthmore. You graciously came onsite some years ago to provide technical advice. I also went on tour of the Fencing Academy and arranged an EPA visit there also. Here is where we are now: we are ready to complete the greening.

In 2004, a contractor installed a fully adhered green roof assembly, at Trinity Church. This 80 mil Sarnafil membrane was installed, with the option to have it as stand-alone or as capable of greening.

We are now interested in Roofscapes bidding on the completion of the 4200 sq. ft. greening of this roof. That would include the drainage (which includes 6 scuppers), growing substrate, and plants. We are also interested in receiving an estimate to retrofit a small rectangular roof over the entrance doorway to the education wing, appx. 100 sq. ft., which would need the entire green roof assembly including membrane. We would appreciate the breakout for labor and materials, and whether any work would be sub-contracted.

Please respond to our interest in completing the green roof assembly. You may want to reply by email; send surface mail; or by calling the Trinity office, 610.544.2297 to arrange a time to talk.

Thank you and shalom,

Peter



Peter Weber, Chair
Buildings Committee
Trinity
301 North Chester Road
Swarthmore, PA 19081
Trinity Church Swarthmore
Posted on: Sep. 22, 2008 1:11pm,UTC
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Trinity Episcopal Church
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"Trinity Church is a parish of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania. We are a faith community with a family atmosphere that combines a variety of worship styles.
"Our emphasis is on worship, outreach and education. We have quality child care in our nursery, a church school program for children aged 4-18 and an excellent program of education for adults as well."





-- The Rev. Thomas R. Cook --


History of Trinity Episcopal Church, Swarthmore





-- Trinity Protestant Episcopal Mission
of Swarthmore as it appeared January 1, 1901. Top Right - The
Rev. Fletcher Clark. Bottom Right - The Rev. Walter Antonio
Matos. --



Trinity Church's 100+ year journey as a faith community
began in the early 1890's. It began with two Episcopalian women
of Swarthmore. One day while they were walking up North Chester
Road, one said to the other words to this effect: "You know, we
ought to have an Episcopal church in Swarthmore."



At that time, about 20 Episcopalian families lived in the
borough, a largely rural settlement dominated by Quakers. Most
of the Episcopalians had been worshiping at Christ Church,
Media, which could be reached by train, preferable by far to
hitching horse to buggy for the haul down to St. Paul's Church
in Chester.



"Like first-century Christians, the
Episcopalians then began holding services in their homes."

An outreach effort, meanwhile, had been bringing Episcopal
women together weekly at each other's homes to sew garments for
people of an impoverished North Carolina mission. Like
first-century Christians, the Episcopalians then began holding
services in their homes.



The first one was on the stormy evening of May 27 1894, in
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred P. Chapman on Cedar Lane.
William S. Neill, who later would be ordained, read the service
and preached.



Soon, clergy of nearby parishes took turns conducting the
cottage services. The Rev. A. J. Arnold, rector of Christ
Church, Media, brought with him a "reading desk." It was
carried from home to home and prayers and sermons were read
from it.



Before the end of 1894, Swarthmore's Episcopalians had
decided that they needed a church building. They checked out
locations, raised some money, bought a plot on the northeast
corner of College Avenue and Chester Road, and acquired a
mortgage.



"A mission has been started under very favorable auspices at
Swarthmore, Delaware County, and has been admitted as a mission
of Convocation," was the optimistic entry in the 1895 Journal
of the Diocese of Pennsylvania.



Construction of the wood-shingled chapel, in the form of a
Latin cross, began in April 1895 and by June was completed. The
church seated about 75 persons, three per pew.



Named Trinity Protestant Episcopal Mission of Swarthmore, it
was dedicated to the memory of the Rt. Rev. Phillips Brooks,
Bishop of Massachusetts and perhaps the greatest preacher of
his time, who died two years earlier. The mission's Bible was
one that Bishop Brooks had used at his church in
Philadelphia.



"The smallest church in the United States"

"The smallest church in the United States, a memorial to the
biggest bishop in the Episcopal Church" was the label some
attached to the pocket-sized mission.



The 1896 diocesan Journal noted: "A church building has been
erected upon a well suited lot and the work of the mission has
been inaugurated with good promise of future growth." The
Diocese asked for and received a $5 annual payment from its new
mission.



On June 18, 1895 the door was opened for the church's first
service. The Rt. Rev. Ozi W. Whittaker, Bishop of Pennsylvania,
began it with the first words of Psalm 127, "Except the Lord
build the house, they labor in vain that build it." The Rev.
Fletcher Clark, newly appointed missionary-in-charge, read a
lesson. By the end of 1895, the membership stood at 40
families.



The Rev. Clark served for two years (annual salary: $525),
to be replaced on June 1, 1897 by the Rev. H. M. G. Huff, who
left after serving exactly one year.



The Diocese of Pennsylvania granted full parish standing in
1919; and with that, The Rev. Walter Antonio Matos,
missionary-in-charge 1898-1920, became Trinity's first rector.
He would continue as such for another nine years.



On November 7, 1931, the cornerstone of the present Gothic
style church was laid; with the building being completed in
1932. By 1940, 45 years after the formation of the original
mission, Trinity Parish had grown to a membership of
approximately 250 families. The early Fifties produced a major
fund drive to finance the construction of a new chancel and the
expansion of the surrounding parish house. During this period,
the music program was increased with help of Trinity's first
pipe organ.






-- Clergy and choir procession down
Chester Road on November 7, 1931, when the cornerstone of the
present church was laid. Right - Fr. Guenther, rector 1930-43,
Bishop Francis M. Taitt, third from left, and other churchmen
at the cornerstone laying. --



Beginning in the Sixties, the parish began sponsoring
refugee families from Cuba, Vietnam and Laos. In the 1970's the
church introduced the new Book of Common Prayer, the choirs
increased and a Casavant Freres pipe organ was installed. From
the late Seventies through to the present, under the direction
of Linda Wilberger Egan, Timothy Hagy, and presently James
Smith, Trinity's Adult Choir has developed into what some have
called the finest choir in the diocese. During the Eighties,
Trinity's first clergywoman was ordained.



The 1990's were designated as the decade of Evangelism and
as a result outreach programs continued to be expanded. For
example, Trinity was host parish for homeless people for
several months over the past three years. The Christian
Education programs were also improved for children as well as
adults.



Trinity Church, Swarthmore continues to grow as a faith
community, well grounded in a positive past.



[ My thanks to Harry Toland for researching and writing
this history. - Rich Englebach



Trinity Episcopal Church
301 North Chester Road
Swarthmore, PA 19081
USA
Phone: (610) 544-2297
Email: nancy@trinity-swarthmore.org
Posted on: Sep. 22, 2008 1:38pm,UTC
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LiveRoof Green Roof System
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With its unique patent pending Soil Elevators™ and Moisture Portals™, the LiveRoof® system gives you the look and function of a conventional green roof “membrane” system, with the turn-key benefits of a modular system. LiveRoof® represents the best aspects of modular and conventional green roofs combined in one simple, attractive effective system. LiveRoof® is an integrated system designed by growers in conjunction with experts in the fields of architecture, roofing, logistics, and ergonomics. It is designed to grow plants! Composed of recycled plastic materials, LiveRoof® is based upon sound horticultural principles. It is earth-friendly, as well as rooftop functional and aesthetically pleasing. LiveRoof® systems, because they are pre-vegetated at the nursery, require minimal maintenance. Compared to site-built green roofs, which are time-consuming and costly to install and maintain, LiveRoof® offers a turn-key alternative that doesn’t require you to be a horticulturist. LiveRoof® modules can be vegetated with various plant assortments to address your particular design needs and climate. And if there is ever any need to make changes to the roof, LiveRoof® modules are easily moved aside and replaced after the work is done.


Aesthetic and Social Benefits




  • Green roofs are much better looking than asphalt or tar.

  • Natural views create more productive, healthy, happy, creative, relaxed people.

  • Green roofs expand the usefulness of buildings via patios, gardens and vistas.


Environmental Benefits



Urban Heat Island Mitigation

The urban heat island effect is the temperature difference between urban areas and their rural surroundings.  The temperature differential causes air currents and dust, and even contributes to violent weather events within urban settings.



Green roof vegetation helps by cooling the air, slowing air movement and acting as a substrate for pollution to settle out and detoxify.



Noise Reduction

Plants, soil, and air trapped in the soil are great acoustic insulators.  Tests indicate that green roofs can reduce indoor sound by as much as 40 decibels, which is of great benefit to occupants of buildings affected by airports, industry, trains and traffic.



Fire Prevention

Succulent green roof plants help reduce the risk of fire.



Water Conservation/Reduction of Storm Water Runoff

The soil in green roof systems acts like a sponge and absorbs excess rain water.  Research has shown that extensive green roof systems can reduce runoff by up to 95% following a 1” rain. 



Green roofs reduce the impact of each new building on the municipal storm drainage system and surrounding watershed.  They reduce flooding, erosion and artificial heating of water which helps preserve fisheries and other aquatic life.



Green roofs reduce the need for on-site storm water management systems.  When combined with an effective rain garden (bioswale), green roofs can make it possible to have zero discharge of rainwater from the site, therefore saving money by not having to connect to the storm sewer system.



Green roofs filter water prior to returning it to the aquifer.  They buffer acid rain and remove nitrate pollution as water slowly percolates through the soil.



What runoff remains will usually occur hours after peak flows, providing additional time for sewer systems to handle the runoff burden from impervious surfaces.
Posted on: Sep. 22, 2008 1:58pm,UTC
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Love the Earth: Plant a Roof!
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Linda Velazquez's entry into the Sundance Green's "What's the Big Idea Contest." It was selected as a top 25 semi-finalist




More Green Roof videos
Posted on: Sep. 22, 2008 3:06pm,UTC
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Some Links
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Green Roof Projects - Over a million Square Feet Planted!

Posted on: Sep. 22, 2008 4:07pm,UTC
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ask ed ~ plant & horticulture Q & A's
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Ed Snodgrass, Horticultural Consultant, co-owns and operates Emory Knoll Farms, a perennial nursery specializing in green roof plants, currently stocking over 100 varieties of green roof plants, and providing over 1 million sf of planted roofs!

Ed answers reader questions, writes occasional articles, and features seasonal greenroof plants for us as a Guest Contributing Editor.


Posted on: Sep. 22, 2008 4:14pm,UTC
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LEED for existing buildings rating system
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Posted on: Sep. 27, 2008 5:35pm,UTC
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Rooftops to Rivers PDF
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Rooftops to Rivers

Green Strategies for Controlling Stormwater
and Combined Sewer Overflows
Project Design and Direction
Nancy Stoner, Natural Resources Defense Council
Authors
Christopher Kloss, Low Impact Development Center
Crystal Calarusse, University of Maryland School of Public Policy
Natural Resources

Posted on: Sep. 27, 2008 5:44pm,UTC
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University Roofs Go Green
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By Margaret Buranen
All across the country, college and university administrators are raising the roof—green roofs, that is. They have discovered what a number of people involved with municipal construction know: green roofs are frequently worthwhile investments of funds for both new construction and retrofit projects. -more-

Photo: Michigan State University

Green-roofed doghouse for Dr. Bradley Rowe's dogs. The retrofitted green roof makes it much cooler during the summer.

Posted on: Sep. 30, 2008 6:22pm,UTC
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Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas
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Posted on: Oct. 2, 2008 2:22pm,UTC
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